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The Oxford Handbook of the Incas

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When Spaniards invaded their realm in 1532, the Incas ruled the largest empire of the pre-Columbian Americas. Just over a century earlier, military campaigns began to extend power across a broad swath of the Andean region, bringing local societies into new relationships with colonists and officials who represented the Inca state. With Cuzco as its capital, the Inca empire encompassed a multitude of peoples of diverse geographic origins and cultural traditions dwelling in the outlying provinces and frontier regions. Bringing together an international group of well-established scholars and emerging researchers, this handbook is dedicated to revealing the origins of this empire, as well as its evolution and aftermath. Chapters break new ground using innovative multidisciplinary research from the areas of archaeology, ethnohistory and art history.

The scope of this handbook is comprehensive. It places the century of Inca imperial expansion within a broader historical and archaeological context, and then turns from Inca origins to the imperial political economy and institutions that facilitated expansion. Provincial and frontier case studies explore the negotiation and implementation of state policies and institutions, and their effects on the communities and individuals that made up the bulk of the population. Several chapters describe religious power in the Andes, as well as the special statuses that staffed the state religion, maintained records, served royal households, and produced fine craft goods to support state activities.

The Incas did not disappear in 1532, and the volume continues into the Colonial and later periods, exploring not only the effects of the Spanish conquest on the lives of the indigenous populations, but also the cultural continuities and discontinuities. Moving into the present, the volume ends will an overview of the ways in which the image of the Inca and the pre-Columbian past is memorialized and reinterpreted by contemporary Andeans.

ISBN-13: 9780197603260

Media Type: Paperback

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Publication Date: 06-18-2021

Pages: 880

Product Dimensions: 9.81(w) x 6.76(h) x 1.23(d)

Series: Oxford Handbooks

Sonia Alconini is David A. Harrison III Professor of Archaeology at University of Virginia. R. Alan Covey is Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas at Austin.

Table of Contents

The Oxford Handbook of the Inca
(Sonia Alconini and Alan Covey, editors)
Table of Contents
List of Contributors
Introduction
PART 1. THE ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE INCA EMPIRE
· 1.1 Writing Inca History: The Colonial Era (Joanne Pillsbury)
· 1.2 Andean Statecraft before the Incas (Jerry D. Moore)
· 1.3 The Spread of Inca Power in the Cuzco Region (R. Alan Covey)
· 1.4 Cuzco: Development of the Imperial Capital (Ian Farrington)
· 1.5 Conclusions: Retracing the Intellectual Journey of Inca Origins (R. Alan Covey and Sonia Alconini)
PART 2. ROYAL ESTATES AND INCA IMPERIAL CENTERS
· 2.1 Royal Estates and Imperial Centers in the Cuzco Region (Kylie E. Quave)
· 2.2 Inca Imperial Strategies and Installations in Central Bolivia (János Gyarmati and Carola Condarco)
· 2.3. The Inca Center of Incallacta in the Southeastern Andes (Lawrence Coben)
· 2.4. The Inca Centers of Tomebamba and Caranqui in Northern Chinchaysuyu (Tamara L. Bray and José Echeverría)
· 2.5. Pachacamac and the Incas on the Coast of Peru (Peter Eeckhout and Enrique López-Hurtado)
· 2.6. Conclusions: The Political Economy of Royal Estates and Imperial Centers in the Heartland and More Distant Provinces (Sonia Alconini and R. Alan Covey)
PART 3. INCA HARD POWER: MILITARISM, ECONOMY, AND POLITICAL HIERARCHIES
· 3.1 Inca Political Organization, Economic Institutions, and Infrastructure (Terence N. D'Altroy)
· 3.2 Cultivating Empire: Inca Intensive Agricultural Strategies (Steve Kosiba)
· 3.3 Fishing Economies and Ethnic Specialization under Inca Rule (Amanda S. Aland)
· 3.4. The Acllacona and Mitmacona: Diet, Ethnicity, and Status (Bethany L. Turner and Barbara R. Hewitt)
· 3.5 Gender and Status in Inca Textile and Ceramic Craft Production (Cathy Lynne Costin)
· 3.6 Making the Typical Exceptional: The Elevation of Inca Cuisine (Justin Jennings and Guy Duke)
· 3.7 Conclusions: Reassessing Inca Hard Power (R. Alan Covey and Sonia Alconini)
PART 4. INCA IMPERIAL IDENTITIES: COLONIZATION, RESISTANCE, AND HYBRIDITY
· 4.1 Inca Colonial Encounters and Incorporation in Northern Argentina (Félix Acuto and Ivan Leibowicz)
· 4.2 Inca Imperial Colonization in Northern Chile (Calogero M. Santoro and Mauricio Uribe)
· 4.3 Inca Mining and Metal Production (Colleen Zori)
· 4.4 Chinchaysuyu and the Northern Inca Territory (Dennis E. Ogburn)
· 4.5 Inca Advances into the Southeastern Tropics: The Inca Frontier in Perspective (Sonia Alconini)
· 4.6 Inca Transformations in the Chachapoya Region (Inge Schjellerup)
· 4.7 Inca Landscapes of Domination: Rock Art and Community in North-Central Chile (Andrés Troncoso)
· 4.8 Conclusions: Inca Imperial Identities-Colonization, Resistance, and Hybridity (Sonia Alconini and R. Alan Covey)
PART 5. SACRED LANDSCAPES
· 5.1. The Ritual Landscape of the Inca: The Huacas and Ceques of Cuzco (Brian S. Bauer)
· 5.2. Rock Shrines, Ceque Lines, and Pilgrimage in the Inca Provinces (Jessica Joyce Christie)
· 5.3. The Inca State and Local Ritual Landscapes (Zachary J. Chase)
· 5.4. Inca Sacred Landscapes in the Titicaca Basin (Jason Yaeger and José María López Bejarano)
· 5.5. Peregrination and Rituality in the Southern Provinces (Pablo Mignone)
· 5.6 Conclusions: Sacred Geographies and Imperial Expansion (Sonia Alconini and R. Alan Covey)
PART 6. ART, ICONOGRAPHY, AND RECORD-KEEPING
· 6. 1 Inca Aesthetics and Scholarly Inquiry (Adam Herring)
· 6.2 Quipus and Yupanas as Imperial Registers: Reckoning and Recording in Tahuantinsuyu (Gary Urton)
· 6.3 The Development and Variation of Inca Architecture (Jean-Pierre Protzen)
· 6.4 Garments, Tocapu, Status, and Identity: Inca and Colonial Perspectives (Elena Phipps)
· 6.5 The Iconography and Use of Inca and Colonial Drinking Vessels (Mariusz Ziólkowski)
· 6.6 Conclusion: Civilizing the Incas (R. Alan Covey and Sonia Alconini)
PART 7. THE COLONIAL ERA: CONTINUITY, CHANGE, AND ADAPTATION
· 7.1 Transformations: Evangelization, Resettlement, and Community Organization in the Early Viceroyalty of Peru (Steven A. Wernke)
· 7.2 Colonial Demography and Bioarchaeology (Melissa S. Murphy)
· 7.3 Vilcabamba: Last Stronghold of the Inca (Vincent R. Lee)
· 7.4 Inca Ancestry and Colonial Privilege (David T. Garrett)
· 7.5 Conclusions: Colonial Incas and the Myths of Conquest (R. Alan Covey and Sonia Alconini)
PART 8. THE MANY USES OF THE INCA PAST IN THE PRESENT
· 8.1. Inca "Antiquities" in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries: (Stefanie Gänger)
· 8.2 Reinventing the Incas in Contemporary Cuzco: The Cases of Inti Raymi and Machu Picchu (Lucy C. Salazar and Richard L. Burger)
· 8.3 Performances of "Pasts": Spaces of Indigeneity and Heritage Tourism in Cuzco (Catherine Elisabeth Covey)
· 8.4 Conclusions: Appropriating the Inca-The Complexities of Social Memory (Sonia Alconini and R. Alan Covey)
Index